How does bridge to let work?

Despite the many financial challenges of the last few years, the property market is one sector that hasn’t suffered. Investors have remained keen to expand their portfolios and the strength of the market has meant that there’s been considerable competition to snap up properties quickly.

For investors buying properties at auction, or simply trying to secure properties before other interested parties, coming up with the full payment quickly can be tough and conventional mortgages are rarely an option due to the length of the process.

This is where bridging finance has thrived as a way of providing investors with large sums of money quickly. And it’s become an increasingly popular choice, with a 40% increase seen in recent years.

In this article, we look at how the process of applying for bridging finance works when you’re not selling the property after purchasing, and who can benefit?

What is bridge to let finance?

Bridge to let mortgages are a specialist form of bridging loan which provides applicants with a pre-approved buy to let mortgage, and it’s designed for investors to enable them to buy a property they’d otherwise struggle to afford with a standard mortgage.

The loan covers the cost of purchasing and renovating a property, just as a conventional bridging loan would, making sums as large as £250m accessible within just two weeks, and even quicker for smaller sums. It’s a convenient and seamless transition for those in need of money to secure a property that’s ineligible for a standard mortgage through to the exit strategy of buy to let finance.

Where a standard bridging loan is suitable for developers who want to sell the property shortly after purchasing, a bridge to let finance is best suited to landlords who intend to keep the property and rent it out to tenants. UK finance brokers Finbri, explain that bridge to lets are suitable for:

  • Experienced landlords & property investors
  • First-time landlords
  • Limited companies, SPVs and offshore companies
  • Expats and foreign nationals
  • Property developers

Rental yields across the whole of the UK average 4.3% and this rises to 4.8% for hotspots in the north-east, making buy to let an attractive investment compared to other options which provide less favourable yields currently.

How does it work?

The initial bridging loan is used to purchase, and in some instances develop or renovate, a property, after which it’s transferred to a pre-approved buy to let agreement once the property is completed and tenants have been found. There are two main ways that bridge to let finance differs from other forms of financing – speed and exit strategy.

While a traditional mortgage can take months to be approved and underwritten, bridge to let finance can be arranged in a matter of days which makes them ideally suited to auctions or situations where borrowers need finances in place quickly to secure long-term gains.

The other benefit of bridge to let is that it delivers borrowers with a pre-approved exit strategy – an essential for bridging finance. Both borrowers and lenders know that once the property has been purchased, and developed if necessary, that it will be let out to paying tenants to bring in an income. This exit strategy is part of the agreement, so borrowers can move from the bridging loan to a buy to let mortgage with the same lender, saving time and stress in the process.

When is bridge to let the right choice?

Unlike traditional mortgages which are renowned for taking months to arrange, bridging finance is a short-term and convenient solution that can leave you with the funds in a matter of days or weeks.

As the name suggests, a bridging loan ‘bridges’ the gap in the financing process, providing quick access to funds to secure a property. Homeowners may need to use bridging loans if they’re in a chain and need the money to buy their next property, or a commercial investor may need finances to purchase a property that’s come available on auction.

Likewise, if you want to purchase a property that’s not eligible for a conventional mortgage, such as a property without a kitchen or bathroom, bridging finance can be used to plug that gap. For buy to let investors, bridging loans are most likely to be used to refurbish a property before it’s suitable for letting, or to expand a portfolio when you can’t initially afford the deposit.

Because of the specialist nature of bridge to let financing, this type of bridging loan provides a flexible source of funding for landlords and developers who want to maximise their opportunities and move quickly on a prime piece of real estate. It comes with the knowledge that you have a long-term plan in place from the get-go, which provides the speed and security that traditional lending can’t always offer.

Final thoughts

Specialist bridge to let products combine several advantages into one convenient package, providing accessibility to large sums of money quickly, the ability to conduct purchases and renovations at short notice, and gradual repayments of the full balance once the purchase has been completed.

With the buy to let market being such a competitive sector, moving quickly is essential to secure the right property at the right price before other investors have the chance, and this may mean moving before a mortgage or deposit can be put in place. Bridge to let loans offer a great solution.

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Transparent data promise

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

Averages shown are the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How do you know the square footage of properties?

We use proprietary technology to read the square footage of properties from agent floorplans. Although we cannot determine the square footage for all properties, we can usually get sufficient coverage. Agents are sometimes known to inflate square footage, and this should be borne in mind as a weakness of this data.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property "price paid" data provided by the Land Registry.

How often is the data updated?

Once per month when released by the Land Registry, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

You can customise the time period using the filter at the top of the view. The default time period is up to 9 months back from today's date. The latest data covers the period up to 2022-03-31, although some sales that took place before this date may still be added in the coming months.

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

What are the statistics used?

Averages shown are the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property "price paid" data provided by the Land Registry, and Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) data provided by Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government.

How do you know the square footage of properties?

We match the Land Registry data to EPC data provided by the MCHLG. Due to the fact that not all properties sold have had an EPC and vagaries of addressing in the UK, we are not able to determine the square footage of all properties, but we can usually get sufficient coverage.

How often is the data updated?

The private paid data is updated once per month when released by the Land Registry, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month. The energy performance certificate database is updated monthly.

What time period does the data cover?

You can customise the time period using the filter at the top of the view. The default time period is up to 9 months back from today's date. The latest data covers the period up to 2022-03-31, although some sales that took place before this date may still be added in the coming months.

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Room let listings on SpareRoom, the UK's biggest room letting website.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from SpareRoom, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded. Yields are calculated by comparing only properties with the same number of bedrooms, e.g. 3-bedroom properties for rent with 3-bedroom properties for sale.

What is the yield calculation used?

The calculation used is (average_weekly_asking_rent * 52 / average_asking_price), expressed as a percentage. It is a top-line gross yield, meaning no expenses are considered.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from Zoopla, Rightmove or Spareroom, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Yields are calculated by comparing only properties with the same number of bedrooms, e.g. 3-bedroom properties for rent with 3-bedroom properties for sale. For the SpareRoom data, hypothetical properties consisting of two to six average double rooms with shared bathrooms are used to derived average rent. For all sources, listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What is the yield calculation used?

The calculation used is (average_weekly_asking_rent * 52 / average_asking_price), expressed as a percentage. It is a top-line gross yield, meaning no expenses are considered.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property "price paid" data provided by the Land Registry.

How often is the data updated?

Once per month when released by the Land Registry, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

Zoopla Zed-index

What time period does the data cover?

The data covers transactions in the last six years

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The listings data is updated in near real-time. The Land Registry data is updated once per month when released, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

The price paid data shown goes back to January 2015. The listings data is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the calculations used?

Average sales per month are for the last 3 finalised months. Turnover is average sales per month divided by total for sale. Inventory is 100 divided by turnover.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The listings data is updated in near real-time. The Land Registry data is updated once per month when released, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

Where does the raw data come from?

We receive data on the extent and corporate ownership of all land titles in England & Wales from the Land Registry.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated once per month when released, typically in the first few days of each calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

This is an ownership snapshot - the data represents ownership as recorded by the Land Registry at the last monthly export.

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

Where does the raw data come from?

We source different expert forecasts Savills, Knight Frank, OBR

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated annually when new forecasts are released, typically towards the beginning of the year.

How is the raw data processed?

We calculate a consensus forecast using a simple mean average.