What will property investment look like after Covid-19?

With the UK’s herculean Covid-19 vaccination programme underway, it appears that the nightmare of future potential lockdowns may finally be coming to end. However, both existing and potential property investors are already asking “what will property investment after Covid-19 really be like?”

In this article, we’re going to explore how the property market is likely to be affected in a post-pandemic world, and how this impacts upon investors. Will continued uncertainty affect the industry, or are more measured outcomes likely? Read on to find out.

Covid-19 and real estate investment: has Brexit also played a role?

Even before we take the pandemic into account, it’s fair to say that the UK has faced its share of uncertainty over the past five years. Brexit, and the ensuing 2019 general election, in particular, caused many to consider the strength of property investment.

After the UK/EU withdrawal agreement however, the Brexit-related uncertainty over the property market and wider economy was lifted. Wen Covid-19 arrived, with plunging GDP and stock market, it became clear that the pandemic was now the new uncertainty looming over the property market.

The impact of Covid-19 on investment property: is there uncertainty around property prices?

Perhaps one of the positives of property investment is that prices tend to remain robust or even thrive during times of uncertainty. To understand how the UK property market has been affected by Covid-19, we need to take a step back to the beginning of the first lockdown, back in March 2020.

Few of us will be able to forget when Boris instructed the entire nation to stay at home in an attempt to tackle the exponential rise in Covid-19 cases. As a result, many businesses were forced to close, with others having to adjust to a “work from home” model.

During this period, a temporary freeze on property viewings meant that the UK property market reached a stalemate. National estate agents reported a drop in demand of 40% by the end of the first month of lockdown.

However, by April, property prices had witnessed a 2.4% year-on-year growth. Fast-forward to July 2020, when chancellor Rishi Sunak had introduced a stamp duty holiday on property purchases, and you’ll have witnessed a huge demand among investors looking to take advantage of the tax savings on offer.

This trend continued throughout 2020, with house price growth measuring nearly 6% by October of that year. If current market predictions are to be believed, UK investors can expect to witness growth of just over 21% by 2025, with properties in the North West seeing the highest increase in prices.

What will happen to the rental market after the Covid-19 pandemic?

With millions of workers adjusting to lockdown life, the rental market witnessed something of an unprecedented kickstart. During 2020, many renters sought accommodation that was better suited to the work-from-home lifestyle, resulting in a boost in demand for houses, flats and apartments with balconies, spacious rooms large enough to accommodate an office desk, shared gardens/terraces, and high-speed fibre broadband to facilitate flawless remote working.

At present, the UK is continuing on its roadmap out of the pandemic. While almost all sectors have now reopened, it looks like the work from home model is here to stay for many, which means this current demand for more spacious rental properties is unlikely to wane anytime soon.

Unsurprisingly, the rental boom has encouraged buy-to-let investors with rising rental yields. Post-pandemic, the work-from-home culture shift may continue to allow people to work more effectively outside of their office bases in large cities like London and Birmingham.

Property investment after Covid-19: has there been a polarisation of sectors?

Perhaps the largest impact of Covid-19 on investment property has been the polarisation between sectors. Leisure, hospitality and retail, for example, have all suffered significant declines in transactional volume and value. Cash flow has been disrupted, and the shift to online delivery models for retail, in particular, has highlighted that perhaps the UK has too much retail space - given that in recent pre-pandemic years, high streets up and down the country had already witnessed retail space being repurposed for housing.

While the retail sector could present itself as a viable investment opportunity in the future, uncertainty across the industry means that when it comes to Covid-19 and real estate investment, it’s perhaps best to avoid retail property for now.

Is it a good idea to buy investment property after the Covid-19 pandemic?

The beauty of property investments is that they have an uncanny ability to weather the storm of economic uncertainty - as the growth in house prices during the coronavirus pandemic already proved. For those who know where to look, there’s no time like the present to find valuable investments in the property market.

As always, there are opportunities for savvy investors - both now, and over the next few years. Whether you hold an extensive existing property portfolio or are interested in becoming a first-time buy-to-let investor, PropertyData can provide you with the tools you need at your fingertips to make smart investment decisions.

Why not check out the list of features available, and find out how these can help you research key areas for investment throughout the UK today?

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Transparent data promise

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

Averages shown are the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How do you know the square footage of properties?

We use proprietary technology to read the square footage of properties from agent floorplans. Although we cannot determine the square footage for all properties, we can usually get sufficient coverage. Agents are sometimes known to inflate square footage, and this should be borne in mind as a weakness of this data.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property "price paid" data provided by the Land Registry.

How often is the data updated?

Once per month when released by the Land Registry, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

You can customise the time period using the filter at the top of the view. The default time period is up to 9 months back from today's date. The latest data covers the period up to 2022-03-31, although some sales that took place before this date may still be added in the coming months.

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

What are the statistics used?

Averages shown are the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property "price paid" data provided by the Land Registry, and Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) data provided by Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government.

How do you know the square footage of properties?

We match the Land Registry data to EPC data provided by the MCHLG. Due to the fact that not all properties sold have had an EPC and vagaries of addressing in the UK, we are not able to determine the square footage of all properties, but we can usually get sufficient coverage.

How often is the data updated?

The private paid data is updated once per month when released by the Land Registry, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month. The energy performance certificate database is updated monthly.

What time period does the data cover?

You can customise the time period using the filter at the top of the view. The default time period is up to 9 months back from today's date. The latest data covers the period up to 2022-03-31, although some sales that took place before this date may still be added in the coming months.

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Room let listings on SpareRoom, the UK's biggest room letting website.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from SpareRoom, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded. Yields are calculated by comparing only properties with the same number of bedrooms, e.g. 3-bedroom properties for rent with 3-bedroom properties for sale.

What is the yield calculation used?

The calculation used is (average_weekly_asking_rent * 52 / average_asking_price), expressed as a percentage. It is a top-line gross yield, meaning no expenses are considered.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from Zoopla, Rightmove or Spareroom, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Yields are calculated by comparing only properties with the same number of bedrooms, e.g. 3-bedroom properties for rent with 3-bedroom properties for sale. For the SpareRoom data, hypothetical properties consisting of two to six average double rooms with shared bathrooms are used to derived average rent. For all sources, listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What is the yield calculation used?

The calculation used is (average_weekly_asking_rent * 52 / average_asking_price), expressed as a percentage. It is a top-line gross yield, meaning no expenses are considered.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property "price paid" data provided by the Land Registry.

How often is the data updated?

Once per month when released by the Land Registry, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

Zoopla Zed-index

What time period does the data cover?

The data covers transactions in the last six years

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The listings data is updated in near real-time. The Land Registry data is updated once per month when released, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

The price paid data shown goes back to January 2015. The listings data is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the calculations used?

Average sales per month are for the last 3 finalised months. Turnover is average sales per month divided by total for sale. Inventory is 100 divided by turnover.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The listings data is updated in near real-time. The Land Registry data is updated once per month when released, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

Where does the raw data come from?

We receive data on the extent and corporate ownership of all land titles in England & Wales from the Land Registry.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated once per month when released, typically in the first few days of each calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

This is an ownership snapshot - the data represents ownership as recorded by the Land Registry at the last monthly export.

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

Where does the raw data come from?

We source different expert forecasts Savills, Knight Frank, OBR

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated annually when new forecasts are released, typically towards the beginning of the year.

How is the raw data processed?

We calculate a consensus forecast using a simple mean average.