How is the 2021 building material shortage impacting housebuilding?

If you have paid even a small amount of attention to the news over the past year, you will have undoubtedly seen or heard stories about rapid rises in the cost of construction materials, on account of a scarcity of things like timber at builders’ merchants around the world. Building material shortages in 2021 have been problematic for home builders - particularly for smaller construction companies or those performing self-builds - where secure storage of materials might be an issue. 

This is because SMEs tend to purchase materials as and when they need them, as opposed to larger corporations which have the ability to bulk-buy and store things for use at a later date. The UK in particular is home to many small construction companies, and the inability to source materials has been particularly problematic for these firms. 

At the end of 2020, some 93% of builders agreed that while building material price trends tend to fluctuate slightly, in 2021 there had been a significant building materials price increase across the board.

Is there a building material shortage?

Price rises in the construction industry can be attributed to a shortage of materials. In 2021, many of the largest builders’ merchants in the UK have warned of a struggle to obtain materials in what can be described as one of the largest supply chain crises in decades. 

In some instances, suppliers have had to begin rationing the sale of certain materials, which has limited the availability of some products and caused the prices of others to increase. Manufacturers and suppliers of commonly-used building materials are now suggesting lead times of up to ten months for certain products. Prior to the current shortage of construction materials, lead times on out-of-stock products typically ran for around three months.

Building material shortages 2021: what construction materials are in short supply?

In addition to a timber shortage, construction companies are struggling to source cement, steel, plasterboard, insulation, roof tiles, and certain electrical components. It is expected that prices could rise by as much as 20 percent on these items. Tools and consumables, such as wheelbarrows, adhesives, paints, plumbing items, and fixtures/fittings are also being rationed by manufacturers and trade suppliers alike.

What is causing the shortage of building materials?

A perfect storm of lockdown restrictions, trade issues and increased demand for raw materials as the pandemic wanes have combined to create the shortage of building materials. As a result, most manufacturers are playing catch-up, with many having had to furlough workers and reduce production. In some cases, manufacturers were forced to temporarily cease production altogether. 

Increased demand for materials has meant that container shipping rates from countries like China have risen significantly. This has led some companies to navigate the complexity of having to streamline orders or make fewer orders to make shipping more affordable, which has led to further material shortages. 

Many plumbing materials come from East Asia, and even the UK’s major container ports are struggling to cope with high container volumes. To make matters worse, the Suez Canal blockage has created a backlog of orders, new UK border rules are impacting the free flow of construction materials, and a major supplier of cladding recently had a warehouse fire. In that respect, it’s fair to say that a combination of bad luck and market uncertainty are the main contributing factors driving the shortage of building materials.

How is the 2021 building material shortage impacting housebuilding?

The biggest problem faced by housebuilders in the UK in 2021 is undoubtedly the widespread shortage of materials. The knock-on effect is that the price of materials continues to rise throughout the industry. For example, British Steel, which stopped accepting new orders for a short period during the pandemic, has been forced to significantly increase its prices, raising costs by £100 per tonne. 

These sorts of price increases have ultimately impacted the overall cost of building projects, with investors having to pay more than previously expected to ensure their constructions come to fruition. Of course, as these ongoing costs get passed down the chain, the end result is that homebuyers can expect house prices to rise as the materials crisis plays out.

However, it won’t just be house prices impacted by the shortages. An absence of construction materials is also likely to delay building projects, which could prove problematic - not just for investors, but for the UK government also. The United Kingdom is currently in the midst of a housing crisis, and a shortage of materials means that even if the Prime Minister announced a decision to build millions of homes, it would be physically impossible without the materials and tools to hand. 

The supply issues have led many companies - particularly those who export construction materials - to resort to spot pricing as opposed to standard contract rates. This means that many builders’ merchants are having to pay for goods based on what products are available at a certain price on a given day - and the uncertainty around this means that smaller construction companies, in particular, are having to weather the storm of now knowing how much they can expect to pay for goods each time they go to place an order. This creates cash-flow issues and contributes to further stalling of construction work.

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Transparent data promise

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

Averages shown are the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How do you know the square footage of properties?

We use proprietary technology to read the square footage of properties from agent floorplans. Although we cannot determine the square footage for all properties, we can usually get sufficient coverage. Agents are sometimes known to inflate square footage, and this should be borne in mind as a weakness of this data.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property "price paid" data provided by the Land Registry.

How often is the data updated?

Once per month when released by the Land Registry, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

You can customise the time period using the filter at the top of the view. The default time period is up to 9 months back from today's date. The latest data covers the period up to 2022-03-31, although some sales that took place before this date may still be added in the coming months.

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

What are the statistics used?

Averages shown are the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property "price paid" data provided by the Land Registry, and Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) data provided by Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government.

How do you know the square footage of properties?

We match the Land Registry data to EPC data provided by the MCHLG. Due to the fact that not all properties sold have had an EPC and vagaries of addressing in the UK, we are not able to determine the square footage of all properties, but we can usually get sufficient coverage.

How often is the data updated?

The private paid data is updated once per month when released by the Land Registry, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month. The energy performance certificate database is updated monthly.

What time period does the data cover?

You can customise the time period using the filter at the top of the view. The default time period is up to 9 months back from today's date. The latest data covers the period up to 2022-03-31, although some sales that took place before this date may still be added in the coming months.

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Room let listings on SpareRoom, the UK's biggest room letting website.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from SpareRoom, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded. Yields are calculated by comparing only properties with the same number of bedrooms, e.g. 3-bedroom properties for rent with 3-bedroom properties for sale.

What is the yield calculation used?

The calculation used is (average_weekly_asking_rent * 52 / average_asking_price), expressed as a percentage. It is a top-line gross yield, meaning no expenses are considered.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated in near real-time.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from Zoopla, Rightmove or Spareroom, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Yields are calculated by comparing only properties with the same number of bedrooms, e.g. 3-bedroom properties for rent with 3-bedroom properties for sale. For the SpareRoom data, hypothetical properties consisting of two to six average double rooms with shared bathrooms are used to derived average rent. For all sources, listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What is the yield calculation used?

The calculation used is (average_weekly_asking_rent * 52 / average_asking_price), expressed as a percentage. It is a top-line gross yield, meaning no expenses are considered.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property "price paid" data provided by the Land Registry.

How often is the data updated?

Once per month when released by the Land Registry, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

Zoopla Zed-index

What time period does the data cover?

The data covers transactions in the last six years

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

What are the statistics used?

The average shown is the interquartile mean, a type of average that is insensitive to outliers while being its own distinct parameter. The 80% range means that 80% of the listed properties fall inside this range.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The listings data is updated in near real-time. The Land Registry data is updated once per month when released, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

The price paid data shown goes back to January 2015. The listings data is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

What are the calculations used?

Average sales per month are for the last 3 finalised months. Turnover is average sales per month divided by total for sale. Inventory is 100 divided by turnover.

Where does the raw data come from?

Property listings seen on rightmove.co.uk, zoopla.co.uk and onthemarket.com.

How often is the data updated?

The listings data is updated in near real-time. The Land Registry data is updated once per month when released, typically towards the end of each calendar month covering up to the end of the previous calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

This is a real-time market snapshot - the data covers currently listed properties. Once properties are removed from the portal, they are soon removed from this tab.

How is the raw data processed?

Duplicates from multiple sources are matched and reconciled as far as possible. Listings with obvious errors, where price or number or bedrooms appear out of range, are discarded.

Where does the raw data come from?

We receive data on the extent and corporate ownership of all land titles in England & Wales from the Land Registry.

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated once per month when released, typically in the first few days of each calendar month.

What time period does the data cover?

This is an ownership snapshot - the data represents ownership as recorded by the Land Registry at the last monthly export.

How is the raw data processed?

No additional processes are applied to this data.

Where does the raw data come from?

We source different expert forecasts Savills, Knight Frank, OBR

How often is the data updated?

The data is updated annually when new forecasts are released, typically towards the beginning of the year.

How is the raw data processed?

We calculate a consensus forecast using a simple mean average.